Alcohol

Alcohol

Prevalence of Current Alcohol Use In The US, 2015

"In 2015, 138.3 million Americans aged 12 or older reported current use of alcohol, 66.7 million reported binge alcohol use in the past month, and 17.3 million reported heavy alcohol use in the past month (Figure 21). Thus, nearly half of current alcohol users reported binge alcohol use (48.2 percent), and about 1 in 8 current alcohol users reported heavy alcohol use (12.5 percent). Among binge alcohol users, about 1 in 4 (26.0 percent) were heavy users.
"Current Alcohol Use

Alcohol Use by 50 Year Olds in the US

Alcohol Use by 50-Year-Olds in the US: "Alcohol consumption is relatively high among 50-year-olds, with over two thirds (68%) indicating that they consumed at least one alcoholic drink in the prior 30 days, 11% reporting current daily drinking (defined as drinking on 20 or more occasions in the prior 30 days), and 19% indicating recent occasions of heavy drinking (defined as five or more drinks in a row on at least one occasion in the prior two weeks).

Prevalence of "Heavy" Alcohol Use in the US

"An estimated 16.7 million people aged 12 or older in 2017 who were heavy alcohol users in the past month (Figure 5), which represents 6.1 percent of the population aged 12 or older (Figure 7). In 2017, 174,000 adolescents aged 12 to 17 were current heavy drinkers. Stated another way, about 1 out of 140 adolescents (0.7 percent) engaged in binge drinking on 5 or more days in the past 30 days. About 1 out of every 10 young adults aged 18 to 25 (9.6 percent) were current heavy alcohol drinkers.

Prevalence of Binge Alcohol Use in the US

"In 2017, about 1 in 4 people aged 12 or older (24.5 percent) were current binge alcohol users (Figure 7). This percentage corresponds to about 66.6 million binge drinkers who were aged 12 or older (Figure 5). About 1.3 million adolescents aged 12 to 17 were past month binge drinkers, which corresponds to 5.3 percent of adolescents. Thus, about 1 in 20 adolescents aged 12 to 17 in 2017 were current binge drinkers. An estimated 36.9 percent of young adults aged 18 to 25 were binge drinkers in the past month, which corresponds to about 12.7 million young adults.

Prevalence of Current Alcohol Use in the US

"In 2017, 140.6 million Americans aged 12 or older were current alcohol users, 66.6 million were binge drinkers in the past month, and 16.7 million were heavy drinkers in the past month (Figure 5). Thus, nearly half of current alcohol users were binge drinkers (47.4 percent), and 1 in 8 current alcohol users were heavy drinkers (11.9 percent). Among binge drinkers, about 1 in 4 (25.1 percent) were heavy drinkers.24

Widespread Availability

Adolescents and Alcohol

(Widespread Availability) "The presence of alcohol in almost all of the polydrug-use repertoires and among all of the different populations addressed is one of the key findings of this ‘Selected issue’. Alcohol is almost always the first drug with strong psychoactive and mind-altering effects used by young people, and its widespread availability makes it the ever-present drug in substance combinations among young adults, particularly in recreational settings."

Prevalence of Heavy Alcohol Use Among US Military Personnel

"• Among current drinkers, 39.6% reported binge drinking in the past month, with the Marine Corps reporting the highest prevalence of binge drinking (56.7%), and the Air Force reporting the lowest prevalence (28.1%).
"• When examining levels of drinking across all services, 9.9% were classified abstainers, 5.7% were former drinkers, and 84.5% were current drinkers; 58.6% of all personnel were classified as infrequent/light drinkers, 17.5% were moderate drinkers, and 8.4% were classified as heavy drinkers.

Alcohol-Induced Mortality in the US, by Gender and Race/Ethnicity

"In 2016, a total of 34,865 persons died of alcohol-induced causes in the United States (Tables 5, 6, 8, and I–2). This category includes deaths from dependent and nondependent use of alcohol, as well as deaths from accidental poisoning by alcohol. It excludes unintentional injuries, homicides, and other causes indirectly related to alcohol use, as well as deaths due to fetal alcohol syndrome. For a list of alcohol-induced causes, see Technical Notes.

Alcohol and Driving

Alcohol and Driving: "When an alcoholic beverage is consumed, approximately 20% of the alcohol is absorbed in the stomach and 80% is absorbed in the small intestine (Freudenrich, 2001). After absorption, alcohol enters the bloodstream and dissolves in the water of the blood where it is quickly distributed to body tissues. When alcohol reaches the brain, it affects the cerebral cortex first, followed by the limbic system (hippocampus and septal area), cerebellum, hypothalamus, pituitary gland, and lastly, the medulla, or brain stem.

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