Marijuana

Marijuana

Federal Interagency Assessment of Cannabis Use in the US

Community Epidemiology Working Group Assessment of Cannabis Use in the US, 2012: "One area representative, from New York City, reported the continuing predominance in indicators and serious consequences of marijuana (as well as heroin and cocaine) and changes in marijuana trends as a key finding in that area for this reporting period. Marijuana indicator levels continued to be reported as high relative to other drugs, however, across all CEWG areas, based on treatment admissions and reports identified as marijuana/cannabis among drug items seized and analyzed.

Effect Of Medical Marijuana Legalization On Crime Rates

Effect Of Medical Marijuana Legalization On Crime Rates And Limitations Of Data: "Given that the current results failed to uncover a crime exacerbating effect attributable to MML, it is important to examine the findings with a critical eye. While we report no positive association between MML and any crime type, this does not prove MML has no effect on crime (or even that it reduces crime). It may be the case that an omitted variable, or set of variables, has confounded the associations and masked the true positive effect of MML on crime.

Effect of Medical Marijuana Legalization On Crime Rates

Effect of Medical Marijuana Legalization On Crime Rates: "In sum, these findings run counter to arguments suggesting the legalization of marijuana for medical purposes poses a danger to public health in terms of exposure to violent crime and property crimes. To be sure, medical marijuana laws were not found to have a crime exacerbating effect on any of the seven crime types. On the contrary, our findings indicated that MML precedes a reduction in homicide and assault.

Impact of Medical Marijuana Laws on Crime Rates

"The central finding gleaned from the present study was that MML is not predictive of higher crime rates and may be related to reductions in rates of homicide and assault. Interestingly, robbery and burglary rates were unaffected by medicinal marijuana legislation, which runs counter to the claim that dispensaries and grow houses lead to an increase in victimization due to the opportunity structures linked to the amount of drugs and cash that are present.

Cannabis Use Disorder (CUD) Definition and Symptoms

Cannabis Use Disorder (CUD) Definition and Symptoms: "CUD is defined in the DSM-5 as a problematic pattern of cannabis use leading to clinically significant impairment or distress occurring within a 12-month period as manifested by cannabinoid tolerance and withdrawal; increasing amounts of cannabis use over time; inability to control consumption; craving; and recurrent cannabis use having negative implications on social, professional and educational life [3].

Pharmacologic Treatments for Cannabis Use Disorder (CUD)

Pharmacologic Treatments for Cannabis Use Disorder (CUD): "As research on pharmacological treatments for CUD continues, a few key findings are of note. First, cannabinoid agonists (nabilone, dronabinol in combination with lofexidine, and lofexidine alone), were the only drugs that decreased drug-taking in a human laboratory model of relapse, supporting the notion that agonist replacement and attenuation of noradrenergic activity show promise for relapse prevention.

How do people get marijuana in states where it's not legal?

"Despite continuing increases in the amount of cannabis produced domestically, much of the marijuana available within the United States is foreign-produced. The two primary foreign source areas for marijuana distributed within the United States are Canada and Mexico. Mexican drug trafficking organizations (DTOs) have relocated many of their outdoor cannabis cultivation operations in Mexico from traditional growing areas to more remote locations in central and northern Mexico, primarily to reduce the risk of eradication and gain easier access to U.S. drug markets.

Marijuana and Driving

"This study of crash risk found a statistically significant increase in unadjusted crash risk for drivers who tested positive for use of illegal drugs (1.21 times), and THC specifically (1.25 times). However, analyses incorporating adjustments for age, gender, ethnicity, and alcohol concentration level did not show a significant increase in levels of crash risk associated with the presence of drugs.

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