Drug Courts

Drug Courts & Treatment Alternatives to Incarceration

Drug Courts and Recidivism

Drug Courts and Recidivism: In a 2003 report, New York's Center for Court Innovation compared recidivism rates between drug court graduates and attendees from six different drug courts, and control groups of similar defendants not entering drug court. They found: "All six drug courts (Bronx, Brooklyn, Queens, Suffolk, Syracuse, and Rochester) produced recidivism reductions compared with conventional case processing.

Recidivism and Completion Rates for Adult Drug Courts in the US

Recidivism and Completion Rates for Adult Drug Courts in the US: "In the evaluations we reviewed, adult drug-court program participation was generally associated with lower recidivism. Our analysis of evaluations reporting recidivism data for 32 programs showed that drug court program participants were generally less likely to be re-arrested than comparison group members drawn from the criminal court system, although the differences in likelihood were reported to be statistically significant in 18 programs.38

Estimated Cost Savings From Use of Adult Drug Courts

Total Enrollees in Adult Drug Court Programs and Estimated Savings: The Drug Court Clearinghouse and Technical Assistance Project at the American University in Washington, DC, released the results of a survey of drug courts in 2001. Based on information reported by 372 of the 420 adult family drug court programs which were in operation as of January 1, 2001, DCC/TAP estimated:

Total Enrollees in Adult Drug Court Programs and Estimated Savings

Purpose of Drug Courts

"The primary purpose of these [drug court] programs is to use a court's authority to reduce crime by changing defendants’ substance abuse behavior. In exchange for the possibility of dismissed charges or reduced sentences, eligible defendants who agree to participate are diverted to drug court programs in various ways and at various stages in the judicial process. These programs are typically offered to defendants as an alternative to probation or short-term incarceration."

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